My endangered wildlife paintings are included in a special category to provide updated information about the protective support that is currently underway by major wildlife conservation partners.

Bengal Tiger - Karen Conger Fine Art
White Tiger Blues
(Colored Pencil, Ink)

This magnificent white Bengal tiger with his powerful and fearless demeanor and watchful eyes was illustrated with blue colored pencils and black ink.

The information below is from the official websites of WildAid.org and WildcatSanctuary.org. (Please see Artist’s Disclaimer at bottom.)

PROTECTING WHITE BENGAL TIGERS

The Wildcat Sanctuary

White tigers are very popular with pseudo sanctuaries, breeders and exhibitors as they tend to bring in more visitors and more money. White tigers are Bengal tigers. They’re not albino or their own separate species, as many people think. White tigers occur when two Bengal tigers that carry a recessive gene controlling coat color are bred together.

It’s been said the entire captive white tiger population originated from one single white tiger and has been inbred ever since. In order to retain this recessive gene, zoos and breeders must continually inbreed father to daughter and father to granddaughter and so on. This inbreeding has caused many genetic problems with tigers such as cleft palates, scoliosis of the spine, mental impairments and crossed eyes. Many of the cubs that are born either in zoos or by breeders have to be ‘disposed’ of because they are malformed at birth.

White Bengal tigers have also been crossed with Siberian tigers to produce a larger specimen which in turn causes even more genetic problems. For years, breeders and exhibitors have been using the excuse that white tigers are an endangered species so they need to keep breeding them. This is completely false. Breeders of white tigers do not contribute to any species survival plan; they are breeding for money.

In reality, the breeding of white tigers compounds the problem by giving the general public a completely incorrect image of these powerful wild predators. It’s also caused a giant surplus of normal golden-colored tigers in the private sector worldwide since most litters have several unwanted golden tigers, too. Out of a litter of cubs, the breeders will pick the white cubs that bring in a lot more money on the market and euthanize, inhumanely destroy or neglect the cubs that do not meet the color requirement.

WildAid.org

Although most prevalent in Mainland China, demand for tiger products also exists in Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and the United States. WildAid is part of the International Tiger Coalition, which is comprised of 42 environmental, zoological, and animal protection groups. Together, the coalition is calling for a permanent ban on the trade in tiger parts and products. To reduce demand for tiger products, WildAid uses our unique communications model with a primary focus on China. We collaborate across all sectors of Chinese society; working with government, business, media partners, and celebrities to encourage attitudinal and behavioral change to reduce demand for tiger products.

Title: White Tiger Blues

(Colored Pencil, Ink)

Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com.

Artist’s Disclaimer
Endangered wildlife descriptions are from the official websites of WCN wildnet.org (Wildlife Conservation Network) and/or WildAid.org. These external links are provided for your convenience and I do not receive any remuneration or other form of compensation for the endangered species art I produce and highlight on my fine art website. I personally donate to both organizations but I am not endorsing either of them and I am not responsible or liable for any information provided by their websites or your use of their websites. Any fees associated with the use or participation in these sites are the sole responsibility of the user. Views or opinions expressed on their sites do not necessarily reflect my opinion and I am not responsible or liable for the content on their sites. Users should take appropriate precautions to minimize risks from viruses, Trojan horses, worms, or other forms of malware. Users should also familiarize themselves with the external websites’ privacy policies and other terms of use, including any collection or use of personally identifiable information. Thank you.